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Center for Transportation Studies

 

The Role of Transportation Researchers in Rehabilitation Hospitals to Keep Patients Mobile

Thursday, September 15

Part of the Fall 2011 Advanced Transportation Technologies Seminar Series.

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About the Seminar

Driving is a significant part of independent living for people of all ages and abilities. Within the next decade, a quarter of all U.S. drivers are expected to be over the age of 65. To address the needs of the growing aging driving population, Clemson University researchers are partnering with two major hospital systems to develop objective training programs as well as develop and evaluate new products and services.

In this seminar, Johnell Brooks discussed the research partnership and its initiatives, which include comprehensive studies of aging drivers. Through these studies, the research team aims to lengthen the duration of patients' independent living status by providing evidence-based preventative measures for senior drivers through medicine, rehabilitation, engineering, and research. Brooks also reviewed the driving simulators, mobility and physical functioning lab, and instrumented vehicle research used in the studies.

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Speaker

Johnell Brooks, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of psychology at Clemson University and an adjunct assistant professor of clinical internal medicine at the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine. She also leads an interdisciplinary research team, the South Carolina Aging Driver Innovation Initiative, which strives to enable aging drivers to maintain their independence as long as safely possible.

More Information

Contact Shawn Haag, 612-625-5608 or haag0025@umn.edu.